Quebec City: A Little Piece Of Europe Just North Of The Border – Part One

27 Aug
Quebec City

Quebec City at dusk. Source: http://oak.cats.ohiou.edu/~corbinc2/

There I was banging away at my Mac, looking for an easy romantic get-a-way for my wife, Stacey, and I. We wanted something different and exciting, we were sick of the old New England standbys (though wonderful destinations) like Martha’s Vineyard, Newport Rhode Island, Woodstock Vermont, and even Foxwoods™ Resort and Casino. With 720,000 square miles from Maine to Connecticut there just wasn’t anything that we were interested in doing in all six states combined.

So I decided to look elsewhere outside of New England (NE), but within driving distance, that we could spend a quality three-night romantic weekend during the Fourth of July holiday. I looked at Niagara Falls, the Poconos, and even another jaunt down to Virginia (that we’ve been to many times), but nothing sufficed. We weren’t interested in flying, spending way too much money, and being under-whelmed by cheesy tourist traps.

And that’s when I said to Stace, “How about Canada?”

To which she replied, “I don’t know, I’ve been to Montreal and didn’t like it all that much.”

“Well, maybe there’s somewhere else in Canada we could go to,” I retorted.

“Well, go ahead and look,” she added.

So I did and after about two-seconds of searching on the Internet I came across Quebec City.

And we’re so glad I did.

I started with the official site of the city that had some basic information about visiting this French Canadian enclave. That piqued Stacey’s and my interest. Then I came across the official tourism site and we watched a well-made Quicktime video about the wonders of Quebec (i.e. the capital of the Canadian province and the surrounding areas) and we were hooked.

What a charming little city it seemed to us, and potentially a wonderful adventure for to embark on within a six and a half hour drive. Quebec could be the perfect romantic destination that we’ve been looking for—and it was as it turned out.

I made a few calls and got us reservations at a quaint little B&B near the old city (more on that later), and “Googled” the driving directions, looked up some sites and attractions, and asked my wife how to say, “good day,” and “thank you,” in French.

Just before our trip we made sure to get our passports as per the on-again off-again TSA rules for going between North American countries. We also got lots of recommendations from co-workers of things to do and see while there. And finally we packed up our car and were off to the Great White North on our little odyssey.

Though the Google maps website puts the drive at about six and a half hours, it really took us more like nine and a half with the stops we made for lunch and gas and just plain stretching out. No matter, the country-side that far North in the US was absolutely amazing. Lush old New England landscapes (right out of a classic painting) permeated the horizon and beyond, the little NE hamlets lining the road and the valleys were charming, and mountainous regions like the Franconia Notch in New Hampshire was awe-inspiring. Even though the Old Man isn’t there anymore it does not detract from the beauty of this venerated place.

Old Man In The Mountain

Old Man of the Mountain on 26 April 2003, about six days prior to the collapse. A late spring snow occurred the night before. Source: http://www.wikipedia.com

Crossing over into Vermont for the last fifty miles before the US/Canadian border I began to get a sense of something unique, something I’ve never felt before: I have never been this far north in my entire life. What a feeling it was to be “driving” to another country. Sure, I’ve been to other countries like Italy, Germany, and The Bahamas, but I’ve always flown and expected the routine to be the same—kind of a disconnected “get on the plane in the US, sleep for a bit, have a few drinks, and get off the plane somewhere else.” But this was not the case when driving to Canada. I felt like a real explorer (for what it’s worth), charting new territory, and getting exhilarated in the process.

Finally it was time to cross the border. The Canadian border check point was relatively quiet and the person checking our passports was pleasant and unassuming. He waved us through and then we were in Canada. Just like that. Not just Canada, but a French Canadian province with its own language and customs. How incredible! Now I was driving Nord on Autoroute 55, and trying to take everything Canadian in as much as I could from the driver’s seat of my car. My wife was amused by my fascination with this whole experience as if she did this everyday and it was no big deal, but it certainly was to me.

We made a couple of nondescript pit stops along the way, but ultimately we got to our destination: Quebec City. I was still having trouble resolving miles into kilometers when suddenly the outskirts of the city crept up on us as the sun was starting to wane. What a beautiful site it was seeing the Saint Lawrence River for the fist time in my life as we crossed over it at that part of the day. Finally, we crossed the bridge we were on and headed for the heart of the city.

L'Arvidienne B&B - Quebec City

L'Arvidienne B&B - Quebec City. Source: http://www.arvidienne.com/

Our immediate goal was to get to the Rue Grande Allee towards the Old City. Our bed and breakfast, L’Arvidienne Couette et Café, was a charming little chateau-like home right across the street from the famed Plains of Abraham where the French residents fought the British army for control of the city back on September 13th, 1759. The French lost, and for over a hundred years Quebec City was ruled directly by the British until 1867. Founded on the banks of the Saint Lawrence River by Samuel de Champlain in 1608, this little settlement had seen centuries of war, development, industry, culture, tourism, and world renown to become one of the greatest North American cities. Per capita, Quebec City has the highest number of fine dining restaurants, and is one of the few places on the continent where English is “not” the most commonly spoken language (excluding Mexico of course).

Mireille and Serge - L'Arvidienne

Hosts Mireille and Serge of L'Arvidienne. Source: http://www.arvidienne.com/

Our ebullient hosts at the L’Arvidienne, Mireille Hubert & Serge Gauthier, were fabulously attentive and endearing as they doted on us from the moment we arrived. Mireille had taken the liberty of making dining reservations for us that evening at an impressive little French restaurant in the old city called, Le Saint Amour. After freshening up a bit we headed out on the Grande Allée to the restaurant.

Grand Allée - Quebec City

Grand Allée - Quebec City. Source: http://www.quebecregion.com


To be continued in deuxième partie


Nicholas Iandolo is a screenwriter and author. His recently published book Cut The Crap and WRITE THAT DAMN SCREENPLAY! is available on Amazon.com and for Apple’s iPad/iPhone. He can be reached at nick@tenthsphere.com. Visit www.tenthsphere.com to learn more about Nick and his writing.

One Response to “Quebec City: A Little Piece Of Europe Just North Of The Border – Part One”

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  1. Quebec City: A Little Piece Of Europe Just North Of The Border – Part Two – Get out tonight. - September 16, 2010

    […] …continued from première partie. […]

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